Interested in Interior Design? Perhaps you are thinking about becoming an interior designer or decorator. Do you know the difference between the two? Look no further. We’re here to explain!

A planned combination of colours, often based on the relationship of colours on the colour wheel. This is very important. Not all colours go together. Sometimes they clash!

Interior Design - Design your Way

Interior Designer Wanted!

style me pretty!

Do you enjoy changing the style, look or feel of your bedroom?

Perhaps you are interested in becoming an interior designer or decorator?

Do you know the difference between the two?

Look no further. We’re here to explain!

Here’s some lingo to help get you started and “speak” the interior
design/decorator language:

Wow, that's Gorgeous!

now for the jargon....

"Colour Scheme"

A planned combination of colours, often based on the
relationship of colours on the colour wheel.

This is very important.

Not all colours go together, sometimes they clash!

How to mix paint colours

"Interior Designer"

A profession that involves more than decorating.

Interior designers work on a variety of interiors, including office buildings, airports,
hospitals, private homes, shopping malls, restaurants and theatres.

In addition to having a sense of style, interior designers need to know about
building codes, safety requirements and environmental sustainability.

"Theme"

An idea that unifies an approach to the entire look of a project.

Themes can be inspired by a time period, world culture or area of interest.

"Retro Theme"
"Retro Theme"

"Universal Design"

A design approach that ensures that an environment is accessible
to people of all ages and abilities.

Now how do you go about creating your colour scheme?

We thought you’d never ask!

When colours are chosen to be used together in a project, it is called
creating a “colour story” or “colour scheme”.

There are many different ways colours can be combined.

Most of these are based on colour relationships on a
diagram called a “colour wheel”.

Here are a few colour schemes to get you started:

Analogous:
Using colours next to each other on the colour wheel, such as orange, yellows and greens.

Monochromatic:
Using shades of one colour. An example would be combining light yellow and dark yellow.

Complementary:
Using colours opposite each other on the colour wheel, such as yellow & pink or blue & orange.

Stay tuned for more as we explore the

exciting world of interior design.

Do you think you know your stuff so far?

If so, take our quiz and good luck earning your Eekahs!

Interior Designer Wanted!

style me pretty!

Do you enjoy changing the style, look or feel of your bedroom?

Perhaps you are interested in becoming an interior designer or decorator?

Do you know the difference between the two?

Look no further. We’re here to explain!

Here’s some lingo to help get you started and “speak” the interior design/decorator language:

Wow, that's Gorgeous!

now for the jargon....

"Colour Scheme"

A planned combination of colours, often based on the relationship of colours on the colour wheel.

This is very important.

Not all colours go together, sometimes they clash!

How to mix paint colours

"Interior Designer"

A profession that involves more than decorating.

Interior designers work on a variety of interiors, including office buildings, airports, hospitals, private homes, shopping malls, restaurants and theatres.

In addition to having a sense of style, interior designers need to know about building codes, safety requirements and environmental sustainability.

"Theme"

An idea that unifies an approach to the entire look of a project.

Themes can be inspired by a time period, world culture or area of interest.

"Retro Theme"
"Retro Theme"

"Universal Design"

A design approach that ensures that an environment is accessible to people of all ages and abilities.

Now how do you go about creating your colour scheme?

We thought you’d never ask!

When colours are chosen to be used together in a project, it is called creating a “colour story” or “colour scheme”.

There are many different ways colours can be combined.

Most of these are based on colour relationships on a
diagram called a “colour wheel”.

Here are a few colour schemes to get you started:

Analogous:
Using colours next to each other on the colour wheel, such as orange, yellows and greens.

Monochromatic:
Using shades of one colour. An example would be combining light yellow and dark yellow.

Complementary:
Using colours opposite each other on the colour wheel, such as yellow & pink or blue & orange.

Stay tuned for more as we explore the

exciting world of interior design.

Do you think you know your stuff so far?

If so, take our quiz and good luck earning your Eekahs!

Take the quiz & earn your Eekahs!