San Francisco

West Coast is the Best Coast

 

San Francisco happens to be both the name of the City and the County’s and is located within the State of California, settled by European-Americans at first after it became the famous base for the gold rush of 1849. The city went on to become the largest and most important population, commercial, naval, and financial centre in the American West. In 1906, a great earthquake and fire devastated most of the area, but the residents soon rebuilt. It’s now the cultural, commercial, and financial centre of Northern California – covering an area of about 121.4 km2.

 

“We’re crazy about this city. The first time we came here, we walked the streets all day, all over town, and nobody hassled us. People smiled, friendly-like, and we knew we could live here, Los Angeles? That’s just a big parking lot where you buy a hamburger for a trip to San Francisco. And the beautiful old houses and the strange light. We’ve never been to a city with light like this. We sit in our hotel room for hours, watching the fog come in, the light change.” John Lennon from the band The Beatles.

 

There’s something mystical about San Francisco that makes people fall in love with it. So why not ask Mom and Dad to plan your next holiday there, so you can see what all the fuss is about?

 

If you manage to land yourself a plane ticket to the West Coast, check out our list below of the top places and attractions to visit while you’re there.

 

 

Golden Gate Bridge:

 

The Golden Gate Bridge’s vaulting, orange arches set against the backdrop of the San Francisco Bay’s rocky seascape have made it one of the West Coast’s most enduring symbols and the city’s number 1 tourist attraction. The bridge’s name refers to the body of water it towers over (the Golden Gate Strait that connects the Pacific Ocean with the San Francisco Bay), and was built to travel between San Francisco and Marin County easier.

 

 

Muir Woods National Monument

 

Muir Woods National Monument falls part of the Californian Golden Gate National Recreation Area, just north of San Francisco. It’s famous for its towering old-growth redwood trees and scattered Douglas Firs. Redwood trees being the tallest of all living things. The tallest coastal redwood at Muir Woods is about 258 feet, approximately the height of a six-foot person stacked head to toe 45 times. So be prepared to stand there in awe of this gentle giant.

 

 

Alcatraz Island in San Francisco

While getting a snap of the Golden Gate is a must when visiting San Francisco, tourists feel the same about Alcatraz. This is due to Alcatraz being so rich in history. Located on a small, rocky island in the middle of San Francisco Bay, Alcatraz is most known as a former federal prison that housed some of society’s notorious criminals, the most famous of which was mafia mob boss Al Capone. Before that, it was a military prison that housed prisoners from the Spanish-American War and Civil War and the site of the West Coast’s first operating lighthouse. The prison is not operational anymore, but the infamous island sees about one million visitors per year.

 

Chinatown

No San Francisco trip is complete without a walkabout in Chinatown. It is the largest Chinatown outside of Asia and wears the crown for the oldest of its kind in North America.  After being destroyed in 1906 by an earthquake, it was entirely rebuilt. Now with its temples, theatres, workshops, small businesses, stores, antique and souvenir shops, teahouses, and traditional pharmacies, Chinatown has become a famous landmark on the West Coast.

 

Cable cars

To experience the charm of San Francisco fully, you have no choice but to hop on board one of their famous cable cars. The cable car system happened to be the last of its kind in the United States and was given a National Historic Landmark title in 1964. The cable car was first invented in the early 1800s by an immigrant from England, called Andrew Smith Hallidie. After witnessing an accident involving a horse-drawn buggy trying to climb a steep San Francisco hill and failing. As luck would have it, his father had the perfect invention to solve the problem. A patented wire rope from England, and he used this to design the transportation. Clever thinking!

The best way to travel by cable car is to hang out of the vehicle while it cruises San Francisco’s vibrant, busy streets. Even though it’s always super busy with long queues, most visitors believe the wait to be well worth it.

Insider tip: If you hate long queues, some say you should rather board at one of the other stops instead of starting at the beginning.

 

San Francisco Golden Gate Park

Named the “lungs” of the city, Golden Gate Park located in the heart of San Francisco is home to gardens and museums. Development began in 1871. The park boasts a network of cycling paths and walking trails and several lakes. It’s also home to over 5000 different kinds of plants and dozens of species of trees and even its very own buffalo paddock. Some other highlights include the California Academy of Sciences Museum with Steinhart Aquarium, the San Francisco Botanical Garden, the de Young Museum and a seriously cool Japanese Tea Garden. It’s worth spending a day here to get the most out of the place.

 

Ghirardelli’s Square

If you’re a bit of a chocoholic, then we insist you make your way to Fisherman’s Wharf. Here you’ll find a little gem of an old chocolate factory known as Ghirardelli’s. It’s a great spot for chocolate fans to visit if they want to sample some treats. But if chocolate isn’t your thing, no need to fear – the square has been turned into an oasis for art-lovers, shoppers and those after some great fun. The square was inaugurated in 1964 and was the first of many projects designed to give new life to abandoned factory complexes.

 

“San Francisco has only one drawback – ’tis hard to leave.” Rudyard Kipling

 

We wish you luck as if Mr Kipling’s famous words are anything to go by it won’t be easy saying Goodbye to this golden coast.

 

 

Resources:

https://www.planetware.com/tourist-attractions-/san-francisco-us-ca-sf.htm

https://www.history.com/topics/us-states/san-francisco

 

San Francisco

San Francisco

San Francisco

San Francisco

West Coast is the Best Coast

San Francisco happens to be both the name of the City and the County’s and is located within the State of California, settled by European-Americans at first after it became the famous base for the gold rush of 1849.

The city went on to become the largest and most important population, commercial, naval, and financial centre in the American West.

In 1906, a great earthquake and fire devastated most of the area, but the residents soon rebuilt.

It’s now the cultural, commercial, and financial centre of Northern California – covering an area of about 121.4 km2.

San Francisco

“We’re crazy about this city. The first time we came here, we walked the streets all day, all over town, and nobody hassled us. People smiled, friendly-like, and we knew we could live here, Los Angeles? That’s just a big parking lot where you buy a hamburger for a trip to San Francisco. And the beautiful old houses and the strange light. We’ve never been to a city with light like this. We sit in our hotel room for hours, watching the fog come in, the light change.”

– John Lennon from the band The Beatles

John Lennon
John Lennon – The Beatles

There’s something mystical about San Francisco that makes people fall in love with it.

So why not ask Mom and Dad to plan your next holiday there, so you can see what all the fuss is about?

If you manage to land yourself a plane ticket to the West Coast, check out our list below of the top places and attractions to visit while you’re there.

The Golden Gate Bridge

The Golden Gate Bridge’s vaulting, orange arches set against the backdrop of the San Francisco Bay’s rocky seascape have made it one of the West Coast’s most enduring symbols and the city’s number 1 tourist attraction.

The bridge’s name refers to the body of water it towers over (the Golden Gate Strait that connects the Pacific Ocean with the San Francisco Bay), and was built to travel between San Francisco and Marin County easier.

The Golden Gate Bridge
The Golden Gate Bridge

Muir Woods National Monument

Muir Woods National Monument falls part of the Californian Golden Gate National Recreation Area, just north of San Francisco.

It’s famous for its towering old-growth redwood trees and scattered Douglas Firs.

Redwood trees being the tallest of all living things.

The tallest coastal redwood at Muir Woods is about 258 feet, approximately the height of a six-foot person stacked head to toe 45 times.

So be prepared to stand there in awe of this gentle giant.

San Francisco
Muir Woods National Monument. Image source: travelawaits.com

Alcatraz Island

While getting a snap of the Golden Gate is a must when visiting San Francisco, tourists feel the same about Alcatraz.

This is due to Alcatraz being so rich in history.

Located on a small, rocky island in the middle of San Francisco Bay, Alcatraz is most known as a former federal prison that housed some of society’s notorious criminals, the most famous of which was mafia mob boss Al Capone.

Before that, it was a military prison that housed prisoners from the Spanish-American War and Civil War and the site of the West Coast’s first operating lighthouse.

The prison is not operational anymore, but the infamous island sees about one million visitors per year.

San Francisco
Alcatraz Island

Chinatown

No San Francisco trip is complete without a walkabout in Chinatown.

It is the largest Chinatown outside of Asia and wears the crown for the oldest of its kind in North America.

After being destroyed in 1906 by an earthquake, it was entirely rebuilt.

Now with its temples, theatres, workshops, small businesses, stores, antique and souvenir shops, teahouses, and traditional pharmacies, Chinatown has become a famous landmark on the West Coast.

San Francisco
Chinatown – San Francisco. Image source: timeout.com

Cable Cars

To experience the charm of San Francisco fully, you have no choice but to hop on board one of their famous cable cars.

The cable car system happened to be the last of its kind in the United States and was given a National Historic Landmark title in 1964.

The cable car was first invented in the early 1800s by an immigrant from England, called Andrew Smith Hallidie, after witnessing an accident involving a horse-drawn buggy trying to climb a steep San Francisco hill and failing.

San Francisco
Andrew Smith Hallidie. Image source: kalw.org

As luck would have it, his father had the perfect invention to solve the problem.

A patented wire rope from England, and he used this to design the transportation.

Clever thinking!

The best way to travel by cable car is to hang out of the vehicle while it cruises San Francisco’s vibrant, busy streets.

Even though it’s always super busy with long queues, most visitors believe the wait to be well worth it.

Insider tip: If you hate long queues, some say you should rather board at one of the other stops instead of starting at the beginning.

San Francisco
San Francisco Cable Car

Golden Gate Park

Named the “lungs” of the city, Golden Gate Park located in the heart of San Francisco is home to gardens and museums.

Development began in 1871.

The park boasts a network of cycling paths and walking trails and several lakes.

It’s also home to over 5000 different kinds of plants and dozens of species of trees and even its very own buffalo paddock.

Some other highlights include the California Academy of Sciences Museum with Steinhart Aquarium, the San Francisco Botanical Garden, the de Young Museum and a seriously cool Japanese Tea Garden.

It’s worth spending a day here to get the most out of the place.

Golden Gate Park. Image source: Viator

Ghirardelli's Square

If you’re a bit of a chocoholic, then we insist you make your way to Fisherman’s Wharf.

Here you’ll find a little gem of an old chocolate factory known as Ghirardelli’s.

It’s a great spot for chocolate fans to visit if they want to sample some treats.

But if chocolate isn’t your thing, no need to fear – the square has been turned into an oasis for art-lovers, shoppers and those after some great fun.

The square was inaugurated in 1964 and was the first of many projects designed to give new life to abandoned factory complexes.

San Francisco
Ghirardelli's Square. Image source: sagarmukala.com

"San Francisco has only one drawback –

'tis hard to leave." Rudyard Kipling

We wish you luck as if Mr Kipling’s famous words are anything to go by it won’t be easy saying Goodbye to this golden coast!

San Francisco
San Francisco

West Coast is the Best Coast

San Francisco happens to be both the name of the City and the County’s and is located within the State of California, settled by European-Americans at first after it became the famous base for the gold rush of 1849.

The city went on to become the largest and most important population, commercial, naval, and financial centre in the American West.

In 1906, a great earthquake and fire devastated most of the area, but the residents soon rebuilt.

It’s now the cultural, commercial, and financial centre of Northern California – covering an area of about 121.4 km2.

San Francisco

“We’re crazy about this city. The first time we came here, we walked the streets all day, all over town, and nobody hassled us. People smiled, friendly-like, and we knew we could live here, Los Angeles? That’s just a big parking lot where you buy a hamburger for a trip to San Francisco. And the beautiful old houses and the strange light. We’ve never been to a city with light like this. We sit in our hotel room for hours, watching the fog come in, the light change.”

– John Lennon from the band The Beatles

John Lennon
John Lennon – The Beatles

There’s something mystical about San Francisco that makes people fall in love with it.

So why not ask Mom and Dad to plan your next holiday there, so you can see what all the fuss is about?

If you manage to land yourself a plane ticket to the West Coast, check out our list below of the top places and attractions to visit while you’re there.

The Golden Gate Bridge

The Golden Gate Bridge’s vaulting, orange arches set against the backdrop of the San Francisco Bay’s rocky seascape have made it one of the West Coast’s most enduring symbols and the city’s number 1 tourist attraction.

The bridge’s name refers to the body of water it towers over (the Golden Gate Strait that connects the Pacific Ocean with the San Francisco Bay), and was built to travel between San Francisco and Marin County easier.

The Golden Gate Bridge
The Golden Gate Bridge

Muir Woods National Monument

Muir Woods National Monument falls part of the Californian Golden Gate National Recreation Area, just north of San Francisco.

It’s famous for its towering old-growth redwood trees and scattered Douglas Firs.

Redwood trees being the tallest of all living things.

The tallest coastal redwood at Muir Woods is about 258 feet, approximately the height of a six-foot person stacked head to toe 45 times.

So be prepared to stand there in awe of this gentle giant.

San Francisco
Muir Woods National Monument. Image source: travelawaits.com

Alcatraz Island

While getting a snap of the Golden Gate is a must when visiting San Francisco, tourists feel the same about Alcatraz.

This is due to Alcatraz being so rich in history.

Located on a small, rocky island in the middle of San Francisco Bay, Alcatraz is most known as a former federal prison that housed some of society’s notorious criminals, the most famous of which was mafia mob boss Al Capone.

Before that, it was a military prison that housed prisoners from the Spanish-American War and Civil War and the site of the West Coast’s first operating lighthouse.

The prison is not operational anymore, but the infamous island sees about one million visitors per year.

San Francisco
Alcatraz Island

Chinatown

No San Francisco trip is complete without a walkabout in Chinatown.

It is the largest Chinatown outside of Asia and wears the crown for the oldest of its kind in North America.

After being destroyed in 1906 by an earthquake, it was entirely rebuilt.

Now with its temples, theatres, workshops, small businesses, stores, antique and souvenir shops, teahouses, and traditional pharmacies, Chinatown has become a famous landmark on the West Coast.

San Francisco
Chinatown – San Francisco. Image source: timeout.com

Cable Cars

To experience the charm of San Francisco fully, you have no choice but to hop on board one of their famous cable cars.

The cable car system happened to be the last of its kind in the United States and was given a National Historic Landmark title in 1964.

The cable car was first invented in the early 1800s by an immigrant from England, called Andrew Smith Hallidie, after witnessing an accident involving a horse-drawn buggy trying to climb a steep San Francisco hill and failing.

San Francisco
Andrew Smith Hallidie. Image source: kalw.org

As luck would have it, his father had the perfect invention to solve the problem.

A patented wire rope from England, and he used this to design the transportation.

Clever thinking!

The best way to travel by cable car is to hang out of the vehicle while it cruises San Francisco’s vibrant, busy streets.

Even though it’s always super busy with long queues, most visitors believe the wait to be well worth it.

Insider tip: If you hate long queues, some say you should rather board at one of the other stops instead of starting at the beginning.

San Francisco
San Francisco Cable Car

Golden Gate Park

Named the “lungs” of the city, Golden Gate Park located in the heart of San Francisco is home to gardens and museums.

Development began in 1871.

The park boasts a network of cycling paths and walking trails and several lakes.

It’s also home to over 5000 different kinds of plants and dozens of species of trees and even its very own buffalo paddock.

Some other highlights include the California Academy of Sciences Museum with Steinhart Aquarium, the San Francisco Botanical Garden, the de Young Museum and a seriously cool Japanese Tea Garden.

It’s worth spending a day here to get the most out of the place.

Golden Gate Park. Image source: Viator

Ghirardelli's Square

If you’re a bit of a chocoholic, then we insist you make your way to Fisherman’s Wharf.

Here you’ll find a little gem of an old chocolate factory known as Ghirardelli’s.

It’s a great spot for chocolate fans to visit if they want to sample some treats.

But if chocolate isn’t your thing, no need to fear – the square has been turned into an oasis for art-lovers, shoppers and those after some great fun.

The square was inaugurated in 1964 and was the first of many projects designed to give new life to abandoned factory complexes.

San Francisco
Ghirardelli's Square. Image source: sagarmukala.com

"San Francisco has only one drawback – 'tis hard to leave." Rudyard Kipling

We wish you luck as if Mr Kipling’s famous words are anything to go by it won’t be easy saying Goodbye to this golden coast!

San Francisco

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