The Louvre Palace in Paris, France. Have you ever wondered which museum was the world’s largest? Well wonder no more, it’s The Louvre Palace in Paris, France. It started 800 years ago as a medieval fortress which has undergone 8 centuries of architectural changes to eventually become a museum that embodies all of French history today. It covers an area of 60,600 square meters and runs along the Seine River in Paris and is one of the largest attractions for tourists.

If you are in Paris, here are some things you can see while visiting the Louvre:

  1. Leonardo da Vinci’s famous “Mona Lisa” painting. The Mona Lisa is only 53 x 77 centimetres (21 x 30 inches) in size. It was stolen back in 1911 and it took 2 years to get it back so now it is covered with bullet-proof glass with guards to protect the painting.
  2. Egyptian sculptures like the “Code of Hammurabi” is on display.
  3. Greek sculptures like “Venus de Milo and “Winged Victory” and “Nike of Samothrace” are also found in their exhibits.
  4. Italian sculptures, “Psyche Revived by Cupid’s Kiss” by artist Antonio Canova and “The Dying Slave by Leonardo da Vinci are also prominently featured.
  5. French artist Eugene Delacroix’s “Liberty Leading the People” inspires millions every year.
  6. Crown Jewels and other artefacts from French nobles.
  7. The building itself is a history in Renaissance and French Classical Style. Can you say field trip for school credit?
  8. The Louvre Pyramid was built in 1988 to enhance the museum’s design and has been celebrated for its unique modern architecture and traditional style.

The Louvre The museum is so vast given its size and the massive collections you can’t get through the Louvre in just one day. It has been reported that over 8.1 million people visit Paris and this beautiful museum so you need to plan for crowds of people. Plan ahead and take one of their tours like the “Masterpieces Visitor Trail” which takes about 90 minutes and shows you the most famous works of art.

To learn more about France and its culture be sure to visit our learning platform for future lessons.

 

Resource: https://www.louvre.fr/en

https://www.livescience.com/31935-louvre-museum.html#:~:text=kan_khampanya%20Shutterstock.com)-,The%20Louvre%20is%20the%20world’s%20largest%20museum%20and%20houses%20one,the%20city’s%20biggest%20tourist%20attractions.

Pretty Paris

Paris

From Paris with Love...

The Louvre

Have you ever wondered which museum was the world’s largest?

Well wonder no more, it’s The Louvre Palace in Paris, France.

It started 800 years ago as a medieval fortress that has undergone 8 centuries of architectural changes to eventually become a museum that embodies all of French history today.

It covers an area of 60,600 square meters and runs along the Seine River in Paris and is one of the largest attractions for tourists.

The Seine River
The Seine River

If you are in Paris, here are some things you can see while visiting the Louvre:

1. Leonardo da Vinci’s famous “Mona Lisa” painting.

eric-terrade-0WQOCx1g8hw-unsplash

The Mona Lisa by Leonardo da Vinci is only 53 x 77 centimetres (21 x 30 inches) in size.

It was stolen back in 1911 and it took 2 years to get it back!

So, now it is covered with bullet-proof glass with guards to protect the painting.

2. Egyptian sculptures like the “Code of Hammurabi” is on display.

diorite-stela-with-the-code-of-hammurabi-2

Wait the code of what what?

The Code of Hammurabi was etched into stone long, long ago and is one of the oldest recorded codes of laws in the world.

3. Greek sculptures like “Venus de Milo", “Winged Victory of Samothrace” and “Nike of Samothrace” are also found in their exhibits.

Venus De Milo. Image source: fineartamerica.com

Did you know Venus De Milo was meant to make up for national embarrassment?

During his conquests, Napoleon Bonaparte had plundered one of the finest examples of Greek sculpture, Venus de’ Medici, from Italy.

In 1815, the French government returned the treasured sculpture, but in 1820, France embraced the chance to fill the hole its absence left in the French culture and national pride.

As such, Venus de Milo was promoted as being even greater than Venus de’ Medici upon her Louvre debut.

The ploy worked, and the piece was met with almost universal praise from artists and critics.

Winged Victory of Samothrace

The Victory of Samothrace stood headless and armless in the Louvre, but did you know that she actually first entered the museum in 1866 without a bust and wings either?

Really?

Yes Really!

One of the reasons the sculpture grew to become so famous around the world is probably due to its slow recomposition that’s happened over a long time.

The Winged Victory of Samothrace has regained her two-thousand-year-old magnificence piece by piece.

Indeed it was only in 1884, that the statue was entirely restored by the Louvre for the first time – bust, wings and bow included.

The Louvre
Winged Victory of Samothrace. Image source:sites.google.com

4. Italian sculptures, “Psyche Revived by Cupid’s Kiss” by artist

This iconic statue represents the story of the god Cupid in the height of love and tenderness, immediately after awakening the lifeless Psyche with a kiss.

Awwww!

Antonio Canova and “The Dying Slave" by Michelangelo are also featured.

The Louvre
Dying Slave by Michelangelo. Image source: citywonders.com

The Dying Slave is a sculpture by the Italian Renaissance artist Michelangelo.

Created between 1513 and 1516, it was to serve with another figure, the Rebellious Slave, at the tomb of Pope Julius II.

5. French artist Eugene Delacroix’s “Liberty Leading the People” inspires millions every year.

Eugene Delacroix

Delacroix painted Liberty Leading the People in order to voice his support for the cause known as the July Revolution.

In July 1830, France rose up against King Charles X, who was extremely unpopular for, among other things, being very conservative in political terms and trying to restore an old regime that French people no longer wanted.

The painting commemorates all those who risked their lives during the July Revolution, and, above all else, honours France.

Viva la France!

"Artists who seek perfection in everything are those who cannot attain it in anything." – Eugene Delacroix

“Liberty Leading the People” by Eugene Delacroix

6. Crown Jewels and other artefacts from French nobles are on display.

Did you know the crown Jewels have an estimated value of between three to five billion pounds?

Just in case you were counting your pocket money to buy it, that’s about 98.783.560.100,00 in Rands.

Yip you’re gonna have to do waaaaay more chores to buy these beauties.

7. The building itself is a history in Renaissance and French Classical Style.

The building itself dates back to the 12th century when it was a fortress built under King Philip II.

By the 16th century, King Francis I began construction on the palace.

The palace was expanded over time until eventually the Revolution happened and it was converted to a museum.

Funnily enough, it was even called the Napoleon Museum at one stage in 1803.

Fun and learning all in one trip!

8. The Louvre Pyramid was built in 1988 to enhance the museum’s design and has been celebrated for its unique modern architecture and traditional style.

Did you know that the Louvre pyramid and the Rock ‘n’ Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland was designed by the same person?

Chinese-American architect Ieoh Ming Pei.

He won the commission to renovate the museum and designed the 70-foot pyramid in 1989.

President François Mitterrand invited Pei to undertake the redesign as more and more crowds made the museum’s expansion necessary.

Just like the Eiffel Tower, the now-famous Louvre pyramid was not popular at first.

Today, the pyramid has become an emblem of the city.

The Louvre

The museum is so vast given its size and the massive collections you can’t get through the Louvre in just one day.

It has been reported that over 8.1 million people visit Paris and this beautiful museum so you need to plan for crowds of people.

Plan ahead and take one of their tours like the “Masterpieces Visitor Trail” which takes about 90 minutes and shows you the most famous works of art.

To learn more about France and its culture be sure to visit our learning platform for future lessons.

Paris

From Paris with Love...

The Louvre

Have you ever wondered which museum was the world’s largest?

Well wonder no more, it’s The Louvre Palace in Paris, France.

It started 800 years ago as a medieval fortress that has undergone 8 centuries of architectural changes to eventually become a museum that embodies all of French history today.

It covers an area of 60,600 square meters and runs along the Seine River in Paris and is one of the largest attractions for tourists.

The Seine River
The Seine River

If you are in Paris, here are some things you can see while visiting the Louvre:

1. Leonardo da Vinci’s famous “Mona Lisa” painting.

eric-terrade-0WQOCx1g8hw-unsplash

The Mona Lisa by Leonardo da Vinci is only 53 x 77 centimetres (21 x 30 inches) in size.

It was stolen back in 1911 and it took 2 years to get it back!

So, now it is covered with bullet-proof glass with guards to protect the painting.

2. Egyptian sculptures like the “Code of Hammurabi” is on display.

diorite-stela-with-the-code-of-hammurabi-2

Wait the code of what what?

The Code of Hammurabi was etched into stone long, long ago and is one of the oldest recorded codes of laws in the world.

3. Greek sculptures like “Venus de Milo", “Winged Victory of Samothrace” and “Nike of Samothrace” are also found in their exhibits.

Venus De Milo. Image source: fineartamerica.com

Did you know Venus De Milo was meant to make up for national embarrassment?

During his conquests, Napoleon Bonaparte had plundered one of the finest examples of Greek sculpture, Venus de’ Medici, from Italy.

In 1815, the French government returned the treasured sculpture, but in 1820, France embraced the chance to fill the hole its absence left in the French culture and national pride.

As such, Venus de Milo was promoted as being even greater than Venus de’ Medici upon her Louvre debut.

The ploy worked, and the piece was met with almost universal praise from artists and critics.

Winged Victory of Samothrace

The Victory of Samothrace stood headless and armless in the Louvre, but did you know that she actually first entered the museum in 1866 without a bust and wings either?

Really?

Yes Really!

One of the reasons the sculpture grew to become so famous around the world is probably due to its slow recomposition that’s happened over a long time.

The Winged Victory of Samothrace has regained her two-thousand-year-old magnificence piece by piece.

Indeed it was only in 1884, that the statue was entirely restored by the Louvre for the first time – bust, wings and bow included.

The Louvre
Winged Victory of Samothrace. Image source:sites.google.com

4. Italian sculptures, “Psyche Revived by Cupid’s Kiss” by artist

This iconic statue represents the story of the god Cupid in the height of love and tenderness, immediately after awakening the lifeless Psyche with a kiss.

Awwww!

Antonio Canova and “The Dying Slave" by Michelangelo are also featured.

The Louvre
Dying Slave by Michelangelo. Image source: citywonders.com

The Dying Slave is a sculpture by the Italian Renaissance artist Michelangelo.

Created between 1513 and 1516, it was to serve with another figure, the Rebellious Slave, at the tomb of Pope Julius II.

5. French artist Eugene Delacroix’s “Liberty Leading the People” inspires millions every year.

Eugene Delacroix

Delacroix painted Liberty Leading the People in order to voice his support for the cause known as the July Revolution.

In July 1830, France rose up against King Charles X, who was extremely unpopular for, among other things, being very conservative in political terms and trying to restore an old regime that French people no longer wanted.

The painting commemorates all those who risked their lives during the July Revolution, and, above all else, honours France.

Viva la France!

"Artists who seek perfection in everything are those who cannot attain it in anything." – Eugene Delacroix

“Liberty Leading the People” by Eugene Delacroix

6. Crown Jewels and other artefacts from French nobles are on display.

Did you know the crown Jewels have an estimated value of between three to five billion pounds?

Just in case you were counting your pocket money to buy it, that’s about 98.783.560.100,00 in Rands.

Yip you’re gonna have to do waaaaay more chores to buy these beauties.

7. The building itself is a history in Renaissance and French Classical Style.

The building itself dates back to the 12th century when it was a fortress built under King Philip II.

By the 16th century, King Francis I began construction on the palace.

The palace was expanded over time until eventually the Revolution happened and it was converted to a museum.

Funnily enough, it was even called the Napoleon Museum at one stage in 1803.

Fun and learning all in one trip!

8. The Louvre Pyramid was built in 1988 to enhance the museum’s design and has been celebrated for its unique modern architecture and traditional style.

Did you know that the Louvre pyramid and the Rock ‘n’ Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland was designed by the same person?

Chinese-American architect Ieoh Ming Pei.

He won the commission to renovate the museum and designed the 70-foot pyramid in 1989.

President François Mitterrand invited Pei to undertake the redesign as more and more crowds made the museum’s expansion necessary.

Just like the Eiffel Tower, the now-famous Louvre pyramid was not popular at first.

Today, the pyramid has become an emblem of the city.

The Louvre

The museum is so vast given its size and the massive collections you can’t get through the Louvre in just one day.

It has been reported that over 8.1 million people visit Paris and this beautiful museum so you need to plan for crowds of people.

Plan ahead and take one of their tours like the “Masterpieces Visitor Trail” which takes about 90 minutes and shows you the most famous works of art.

To learn more about France and its culture be sure to visit our learning platform for future lessons.