WORLD MOON DAY

World Moon Day On July 20, 1969, a historic thing happened. Astronaut Neil Armstrong stepped onto the surface of the moon. He uttered the famous words: “That’s one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind,” Moon Day celebrates not only this massive moment in history but also reminds us of all of the hard work it took to get the space program off the ground. Literally! The space race was hectic and ended with the Americans being the first to plant their flag on the moon. Stick around as the story is a fascinating one.

 

American astronauts Edwin Aldrin or Buzz as he was affectionately known and Neil Armstrong became the first humans to land on the Moon on July 20, 1969. The incredible space mission called Apollo 11 took place eight years after President John F Kennedy made it America’s goal to send a man to the moon by the end of the 60. Quite ambitious, don’t you think

 

President Kennedy spoke to a special joint session of Congress in 1961, stating, “I believe this nation should commit itself to achieve the goal, before this decade is out, of landing a man on the moon and returning him safely to Earth.” 

 

Since it was during the Cold War, the proposal by Kennedy was a nice change of topic. During this time, the United States was still competing with its fiercest rival, the Soviet Union, regarding space exploration. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration initiated the first crewless Apollo mission, NASA, after five years of effort and hard work by their international team of engineers and scientists. The first mission served as a testing phase for the structural resilience of the launch spacecraft vehicle. 

World Moon Day

At 9:32 A.M. on July 16, 1969, the whole world witnessed Apollo 11 take off from Kennedy Space Center with three astronauts on board. Wow! Neil Armstrong was the main man in charge of the mission or commander, as they like to call them at NASA. The spacecraft entered the lunar orbit after only three days, on July 19. Eagle, the lunar module, disengaged from the central command module the next day, manned by Armstrong and Aldrin. A third Astronaut waited in the module alone in orbit until Armstrong and Aldrin returned. When Eagle touched the moon, Armstrong radioed his historical message to Mission Control in Houston, Texas: “The Eagle has landed.” Ahh, so that’s where that saying comes from!

 

At 10:39 P.M., A mere six hours after landing on the moon, Armstrong made his way down the ladder after exiting the module and stepped onto the lunar surface. Woah, that’s epic! His progress was recorded by a television camera attached to the module, transmitting live signals back to Earth, where the world watched and held its breath.

Two and a half hours were spent outside the spacecraft, exploring the moon. Buzz Aldrin also set foot onto the moon and joined Armstrong to collect 21.5 kgs of lunar material to examine. Their specimens made the trip back to Earth with them to be analysed. Imagine how he must have felt knowing his friends were out there on the moon?

 

Isn’t it amazing? We put men on the moon! No matter how many years pass, we will always be in awe of the first moon landing in 1969. After all, landing on the moon was a huge step for humankind and our understanding of the grand universe we exist in. 

 

#minimeba fun fact

 

Did you know? Krispy Kreme was at the launch of Apollo 11 in 1969, serving fresh doughnuts to Americans who had gathered to witness the lift-off of this monumental mission. Awesome. Why not visit your nearest Krispy Kreme today and celebrate Moon Day? Go on; you know you want to! Send us pics! 

 

Reference:

 

National Moon Day. https://nationaltoday.com/national-moon-day/ 

World Moon Day

World Moon Day

Magnanimous Moon

On July 20, 1969, a historic thing happened.

Astronaut Neil Armstrong stepped onto the surface of the moon.

He uttered the famous words: “That’s one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind”.

Moon Day celebrates not only this massive moment in history but also reminds us of all of the hard work it took to get the space program off the ground.

Literally!

The space race was hectic and ended with the Americans being the first to plant their flag on the moon.

Stick around as the story is a fascinating one.

World Moon Day

American astronauts Edwin Aldrin or Buzz as he was affectionately known and Neil Armstrong became the first humans to land on the Moon on July 20, 1969.

The incredible space mission called Apollo 11 took place eight years after President John F Kennedy made it America’s goal to send a man to the moon by the end of the 60s. Quite ambitious, don’t you think?

Michael Collins (October 31, 1930 – April 28, 2021) was an American astronaut who flew the Apollo 11 command module Columbia around the Moon in 1969 while his crewmates, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin, made the first crewed landing on the surface. He was also a test pilot and major general in the U.S. Air Force Reserves.
Left to right: Michael Collins, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin. Michael Collins (October 31, 1930 – April 28, 2021) was an American astronaut who flew the Apollo 11 command module Columbia around the Moon in 1969 while his crewmates, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin, made the first crewed landing on the surface. He was also a test pilot and major general in the U.S. Air Force Reserves.

President Kennedy spoke to a special joint session of Congress in 1961, stating: “I believe this nation should commit itself to achieve the goal, before this decade is out, of landing a man on the moon and returning him safely to Earth.”

World Moon Day
Fifty years ago today, President John F. Kennedy ascended a podium at Rice University in front of a crowd of 40,000 and described America’s quest to go to the moon as the “the most hazardous and dangerous and greatest adventure on which man has ever embarked”. Image source: texasmonthly.com

Since it was during the Cold War, the proposal by Kennedy was a nice change of topic.

During this time, the United States was still competing with its fiercest rival, the Soviet Union, regarding space exploration.

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration initiated the first crewless Apollo mission, NASA, after five years of effort and hard work by their international team of engineers and scientists.

The first mission served as a testing phase for the structural resilience of the launch spacecraft vehicle.

World Moon Day

At 9:32 A.M. on July 16, 1969, the whole world witnessed Apollo 11 take off from Kennedy Space Center with three astronauts on board.

Wow!

Neil Armstrong was the main man in charge of the mission or commander, as they like to call them at NASA.

The spacecraft entered the lunar orbit after only three days, on July 19. Eagle, the lunar module, disengaged from the central command module the next day, manned by Armstrong and Aldrin.

A third astronaut waited in the module alone in orbit until Armstrong and Aldrin returned. When Eagle touched the moon, Armstrong radioed his historical message to Mission Control in Houston, Texas: “The Eagle has landed.”

Ahh, so that’s where that saying comes from!

World Moon Day
Buzz Aldrin climbing out of Apollo 11 Lunar Module "Eagle". Image source: reddit.com

At 10:39 P.M., a mere six hours after landing on the moon, Armstrong made his way down the ladder after exiting the module and stepped onto the lunar surface.

Woah, that’s epic!

His progress was recorded by a television camera attached to the module, transmitting live signals back to Earth, where the world watched and held its breath.

World Moon Day

Two and a half hours were spent outside the spacecraft, exploring the moon.

Buzz Aldrin also set foot onto the moon and joined Armstrong to collect 21.5kg of lunar material to examine.

Their specimens made the trip back to Earth with them to be analysed.

World Moon Day

Isn’t it amazing?

We put men on the moon!

No matter how many years pass, we will always be in awe of the first moon landing in 1969.

After all, landing on the moon was a huge step for humankind and our understanding of the grand universe we exist in.

World Moon Day

#minimeba fun fact!

Did you know? Krispy Kreme was at the launch of Apollo 11 in 1969, serving fresh doughnuts to Americans who had gathered to witness the lift-off of this monumental mission. Awesome. Why not visit your nearest Krispy Kreme today and celebrate Moon Day? Go on; you know you want to! Send us pics!

World Moon Day

Magnanimous Moon

On July 20, 1969, a historic thing happened.

Astronaut Neil Armstrong stepped onto the surface of the moon.

He uttered the famous words: “That’s one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind”.

Moon Day celebrates not only this massive moment in history but also reminds us of all of the hard work it took to get the space program off the ground.

Literally!

The space race was hectic and ended with the Americans being the first to plant their flag on the moon.

Stick around as the story is a fascinating one.

World Moon Day

American astronauts Edwin Aldrin or Buzz as he was affectionately known and Neil Armstrong became the first humans to land on the Moon on July 20, 1969.

The incredible space mission called Apollo 11 took place eight years after President John F Kennedy made it America’s goal to send a man to the moon by the end of the 60s. Quite ambitious, don’t you think?

Michael Collins (October 31, 1930 – April 28, 2021) was an American astronaut who flew the Apollo 11 command module Columbia around the Moon in 1969 while his crewmates, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin, made the first crewed landing on the surface. He was also a test pilot and major general in the U.S. Air Force Reserves.
Left to right: Michael Collins, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin. Michael Collins (October 31, 1930 – April 28, 2021) was an American astronaut who flew the Apollo 11 command module Columbia around the Moon in 1969 while his crewmates, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin, made the first crewed landing on the surface. He was also a test pilot and major general in the U.S. Air Force Reserves.

President Kennedy spoke to a special joint session of Congress in 1961, stating: “I believe this nation should commit itself to achieve the goal, before this decade is out, of landing a man on the moon and returning him safely to Earth.”

World Moon Day
Fifty years ago today, President John F. Kennedy ascended a podium at Rice University in front of a crowd of 40,000 and described America’s quest to go to the moon as the “the most hazardous and dangerous and greatest adventure on which man has ever embarked”. Image source: texasmonthly.com

Since it was during the Cold War, the proposal by Kennedy was a nice change of topic.

During this time, the United States was still competing with its fiercest rival, the Soviet Union, regarding space exploration.

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration initiated the first crewless Apollo mission, NASA, after five years of effort and hard work by their international team of engineers and scientists.

The first mission served as a testing phase for the structural resilience of the launch spacecraft vehicle.

World Moon Day

At 9:32 A.M. on July 16, 1969, the whole world witnessed Apollo 11 take off from Kennedy Space Center with three astronauts on board.

Wow!

Neil Armstrong was the main man in charge of the mission or commander, as they like to call them at NASA.

The spacecraft entered the lunar orbit after only three days, on July 19. Eagle, the lunar module, disengaged from the central command module the next day, manned by Armstrong and Aldrin.

A third astronaut waited in the module alone in orbit until Armstrong and Aldrin returned. When Eagle touched the moon, Armstrong radioed his historical message to Mission Control in Houston, Texas: “The Eagle has landed.”

Ahh, so that’s where that saying comes from!

World Moon Day
Buzz Aldrin climbing out of Apollo 11 Lunar Module "Eagle". Image source: reddit.com

At 10:39 P.M., a mere six hours after landing on the moon, Armstrong made his way down the ladder after exiting the module and stepped onto the lunar surface.

Woah, that’s epic!

His progress was recorded by a television camera attached to the module, transmitting live signals back to Earth, where the world watched and held its breath.

World Moon Day

Two and a half hours were spent outside the spacecraft, exploring the moon.

Buzz Aldrin also set foot onto the moon and joined Armstrong to collect 21.5kg of lunar material to examine.

Their specimens made the trip back to Earth with them to be analysed.

World Moon Day

Isn’t it amazing?

We put men on the moon!

No matter how many years pass, we will always be in awe of the first moon landing in 1969.

After all, landing on the moon was a huge step for humankind and our understanding of the grand universe we exist in.

World Moon Day

#minimeba fun fact!

Did you know? Krispy Kreme was at the launch of Apollo 11 in 1969, serving fresh doughnuts to Americans who had gathered to witness the lift-off of this monumental mission. Awesome. Why not visit your nearest Krispy Kreme today and celebrate Moon Day? Go on; you know you want to! Send us pics!

Resource:

nationaltoday.com