Have you ever heard of Cleopatra? Yes? No?

 

Yes or no, let’s lay some more foundation for you and get to know her a bit better!

 

Cleopatra was the most famous Queen of Egypt.  Two great loves existed for her: Julius Caesar, and then her husband, Marc Anthony. It is said that she was a fearless leader who wore makeup like a boss. No doubt, she turned some heads back in the day.

 

Cleopatra came into power around the 1st Century BC (over 2200 years ago). Around this time, the Egyptians had a vast range of cosmetics available. A bit different to nowadays cosmetics, they used rocks, minerals and plants found around town to produce their makeup!

 

One of the first eye shadows to hit Ancient Egypt was made from a mineral called malachite. It was ground it into a thick paste, and it was bright green. Funky! Cleopatra would adorn her lower eyelids with this. She then applied a deep blue eye paint with beautiful gold-coloured pyrite flecks made from ground Lapis lazuli (gemstone) for her upper eyelids. Sounds like an epic YouTube tutorial!

She would then darken her eyebrows and lengthen her eyelashes with black kohl, a mixture of powdered lead sulfide and animal fat (groovy). In other words, almost like the mascara, we use today.

Lastly, lips and cheekbones!

Cleopatra used red ochre for her lipstick and rouge, a type of clay which gets its red colour from iron oxide, for blush.

MiniMeba Fact: Ochre, is a natural clay earth pigment which is a mixture of ferric oxide and varying amounts of clay and sand. It ranges in colour from yellow to deep orange or brown. It is also the name of the colours produced by this pigment, especially a light brownish-yellow.

The Egyptians used many resources to decorate themselves, including their Privet tree used to create a reddish-brown dye known as henna, which Cleopatra used as nail polish. She also used the henna for beautiful, elaborate designs painted on her hands’ palms. Some Indian cultures practise this tradition today.

 

Historians believe there was more to this makeup than meets the eye though.

CleopatraFor example, dark pigment painted around the eye helped protect Egyptian eyes from the blazing midday sun glaring off the picture-postcard desert sands.

 

Scientists also analysed ancient makeup residue found in and around Egyptian tombs. They discovered that the makeup contained lead, which we now know is somewhat poisonous to humans. Luckily, the makeup composed low doses of lead, that instead of causing damage, it actually helped boost the immune system.

 

How? When lead salts come into contact with skin, they often produce an oxide known as nitric oxide. Various studies concluded that ancient Egyptians might have increased their oxide levels by wearing this eye-makeup, which stimulated immune cells and prevented multiple eye diseases and infections.

 

It’s no wonder that the world marvels when it comes to Ancient Egypt; research has led to many discoveries that we still use in today’s modern world. Thanks, guys!

 

Come back for more beauty tips from the past, the present, and even the future! Check out our UR-Blog, so you don’t miss out!

 

Resource:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beauty_and_cosmetics_in_ancient_Egypt

Cleopatra - Pioneer of Makeup

Cleopatra

Colourful Cleo!

Have you ever heard of Cleopatra?

Yes? No?

Yes or no, let’s lay some more foundation for you and get to know her a bit better!

Cleopatra and Marc Anthony
Cleopatra and Marc Anthony. Image source: bbc.co.uk

Cleopatra was the most famous Queen of Egypt.

Two great loves existed for her: Julius Caesar,
and then her husband, Marc Anthony.

It is said that she was a fearless leader who wore makeup like a boss.

No doubt, she turned some heads back in the day.

Egyptians used minerals for make-up

Cleopatra came into power around the 1st Century BC (over 2200 years ago).

Around this time, the Egyptians had a vast range of cosmetics available.

A bit different to nowadays cosmetics, they used rocks, minerals and
plants found around town to produce their makeup!

One of the first eye shadows to hit Ancient Egypt was made
from a mineral called malachite.

It was ground into a thick paste, and it was bright green.

Funky!

Cleopatra would adorn her lower eyelids with this.

She then applied deep blue eye paint with beautiful gold-coloured pyrite flecks
made from ground Lapis lazuli (gemstone) for her upper eyelids.

Sounds like an epic YouTube tutorial!

She would then darken her eyebrows and lengthen her eyelashes with black kohl,
a mixture of powdered lead sulfide and animal fat (groovy).

In other words, almost like the mascara, we use today.

Lastly, lips and cheekbones!

Cleopatra used red ochre for her lipstick and rouge, a type of clay that
gets its red colour from iron oxide, for blush.

Red Ochre

#minimeba fact!

Ochre, is a natural clay earth pigment which is a mixture of ferric oxide and varying amounts of clay and sand. It ranges in colour from yellow to deep orange or brown. It is also the name of the colours produced by this pigment, especially a light brownish-yellow.

The Egyptians used many resources to decorate themselves, including their
Privet tree used to create a reddish-brown dye known as henna,
which Cleopatra used as nail polish.

She also used henna for beautiful, elaborate designs
painted on her hands’ palms.

Some Indian cultures practise this tradition today.

Henna Tattoo

Historians believe there was more to this makeup than meets the eye though.

For example, dark pigment painted around the eye helped protect Egyptian eyes
from the blazing midday sun glaring off the picture-postcard desert sands.

Scientists also analysed ancient makeup residue found
in and around Egyptian tombs.

They discovered that the makeup contained lead, which we now
know is somewhat poisonous to humans.

Luckily, the makeup composed low doses of lead, that instead of
causing damage actually helped boost the immune system.

how?

When lead salts come into contact with skin, they often
produce an oxide known as nitric oxide.

Various studies concluded that ancient Egyptians might have increased their
oxide levels by wearing this eye-makeup, which stimulated immune
cells and prevented multiple eye diseases and infections.

It’s no wonder that the world marvels when it comes to Ancient Egypt; research
has led to many discoveries that we still use in today’s modern world.

Thanks, guys!

Come back for more beauty tips from the past, the present, and even the future!

Check out our UR-Blog, so you don’t miss out!

Cleopatra

Colourful Cleo!

Have you ever heard of Cleopatra?

Yes? No?

Yes or no, let’s lay some more foundation for you and get to know her a bit better!

Cleopatra and Marc Anthony
Cleopatra and Marc Anthony. Image source: bbc.co.uk

Cleopatra was the most famous Queen of Egypt.

Two great loves existed for her: Julius Caesar, and then her husband, Marc Anthony.

It is said that she was a fearless leader who wore makeup like a boss.

No doubt, she turned some heads back in the day.

Egyptians used minerals for make-up

Cleopatra came into power around the 1st Century BC (over 2200 years ago).

Around this time, the Egyptians had a vast range of cosmetics available.

A bit different to nowadays cosmetics, they used rocks, minerals and plants found around town to produce their makeup!

One of the first eye shadows to hit Ancient Egypt was made from a mineral called malachite.

It was ground into a thick paste, and it was bright green.

Funky!

Cleopatra would adorn her lower eyelids with this.

She then applied deep blue eye paint with beautiful gold-coloured pyrite flecks made from ground Lapis lazuli (gemstone) for her upper eyelids.

Sounds like an epic YouTube tutorial!

She would then darken her eyebrows and lengthen her eyelashes with black kohl, a mixture of powdered lead sulfide and animal fat (groovy).

In other words, almost like the mascara, we use today.

Lastly, lips and cheekbones!

Cleopatra used red ochre for her lipstick and rouge, a type of clay that gets its red colour from iron oxide, for blush.

Red Ochre

#minimeba fact!

Ochre, is a natural clay earth pigment which is a mixture of ferric oxide and varying amounts of clay and sand. It ranges in colour from yellow to deep orange or brown. It is also the name of the colours produced by this pigment, especially a light brownish-yellow.

The Egyptians used many resources to decorate themselves, including their Privet tree used to create a reddish-brown dye known as henna, which Cleopatra used as nail polish.

She also used henna for beautiful, elaborate designs painted on her hands’ palms.

Some Indian cultures practise this tradition today.

Henna Tattoo

Historians believe there was more to this makeup than meets the eye though.

For example, dark pigment painted around the eye helped protect Egyptian eyes from the blazing midday sun glaring off the picture-postcard desert sands.

Scientists also analysed ancient makeup residue found in and around Egyptian tombs.

They discovered that the makeup contained lead, which we now know is somewhat poisonous to humans.

Luckily, the makeup composed low doses of lead, that instead of causing damage actually helped boost the immune system.

how?

When lead salts come into contact with skin, they often produce an oxide known as nitric oxide.

Various studies concluded that ancient Egyptians might have increased their oxide levels by wearing this eye-makeup, which stimulated immune cells and prevented multiple eye diseases and infections.

It’s no wonder that the world marvels when it comes to Ancient Egypt; research has led to many discoveries that we still use in today’s modern world.

Thanks, guys!

Come back for more beauty tips from the past, the present, and even the future!

Check out our UR-Blog, so you don’t miss out!

Take the quiz & earn your Eekahs!

Resource:

wikipedia.org